History

Our roots, established more than half a century ago, originated in the domestic manufacture of metal cutting tools and gear boxes. In 1955 we were known as Beloit Tool and set up shop in a roller rink in Beloit, Wisconsin. We have moved our corporate headquarters and re-branded our company several times since 1955. We currently reside in downtown Beloit, Wisconsin and are now known as simply “Regal.”


Strategic Growth

In 1980 sales were about $40 million—impressive at the time—however, we had bigger aspirations. James L. Packard and Henry W. Knueppel joined the company and initiated an aggressive acquisition strategy to expand our business. A key part of our growth can be attributed to the 69 acquisitions we successfully completed since 1955, including multiple acquisitions that catapulted the company into the power transmission, electric motor, electric generator and the customer electronic controls businesses. By the end of 2004, approaching our 50th year of operation, our annual sales reached $756 million.

Transforming Into a Global Company
Regal ‘s transformation into a more global manufacturer of motors began with the 2004 and 2005 acquisitions of GE’s Commercial AC and HVAC motor businesses which had combined annual revenues of over $600 million. By the end of 2005, the company had sales exceeding $1.4 billion.


In 2011, and again in 2015, under the leadership of CEO Mark J. Gliebe, the largest acquisitions in our history occurred with the purchases of A.O. Smith's Electrical Products Company (EPC) and Emerson's Power Transmission Solutions (PTS) business. By the end of 2015, the company’s total sales were $3.5 billion.


The EPC and PTS acquisitions further strengthened the company’s global footprint, diversified end markets, and broadened our product and technology portfolios, allowing us to serve our customers in three strong business segments: Climate Solutions, Commercial & Industrial Systems and Power Transmission Solutions.

Creating A Better Tomorrow
We are committed to developing and producing energy efficient products and systems that not only improve the productivity of our society, but also reduce the power required to deliver the motion.